Tag Archives: yocona in exile

Missing Yocona in Exile?

16 May

I’m ashamed to admit that I just found out at an Oxford Secret Supper that Lenora’s hosted a special Yocona Night on Mother’s Day! Yes, that’s right! Paige Osborn was at Lenora’s on Mother’s Day, serving up a Yocona menu. The bar was also open thanks to the new Sunday Sales ruling (no brown bags necessary).

Well, consider this fair warning for the next Yocona Night. It’s scheduled to happen on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 19th, at Lenora’s. Mark your calendars now and make your reservations early (turns out they will be taking reservations this time). Sunday alcohol sales will apply again for Father’s Day (11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.). Check in with the Yocona in Exile Facebook page for updates closer to the event.

Paige says they plan to hold Yocona Nights on a regular basis, although probably not on Sundays.

In the meantime, if you’ve been craving some Yocona Sauce, you can pick up a bottle of it in several places around town:

Mississippi Madness
LB’s Meat Market
The Farmer’s Market on Old 7
Stan’s on Highway 6 West (near the Water Valley exit)
The Red Door gift shop in Pontotoc

If you’re out of town and would like a bottle shipped, the folks at Mississippi Madness can hook you up: 662-234-5280.

Yocona in Exile Closing Its Doors

2 Dec

Say it ain’t so! So many delicious meals were had at Yocona River Inn and Yocona in Exile; I’m so sad to see them go.

From the Yocona website:

It is with a very heavy heart that I inform you that Yocona in Exile will be closing its doors at the end of this weekend. We re-opened on a shoestring with nothing to fall back on, and this economy has taken its toll. I am truly grateful for the support and patronage that everyone has shown over the last 15 years. Thank you.

Our plan is to be open through Sunday night, but I’m afraid that we may run out of food. Please give us a call (662.234.2464) if you want to check the status of the menu before driving out.

Oxford Recipe: Yocona Bread and Butter

7 Jun

Photo: applepiepatispate.com

OK folks, time for another recipe. I have a feeling that this is one everyone wants. Who doesn’t enjoy the bread and butter at Yocona in Exile (A.K.A. Yocona River Inn)? Personally, I could top just about everything in my kitchen with that butter–including my oven mitts!

The recipe for the bread and the butter is below, so you may want to print them out. Both are courtesy of Yocona owner Paige Osborn.

If you’re a restaurateur or know one who wants to share a recipe with EatingOxford.com, contact me at foodie@eatingoxford.com.

Yocona French Bread (©2000, Paige Osborn)

  • 1/3 cup warm water (below 110°)
  • pinch sugar
  • 1 packet (about 2 teaspoons) yeast, dry active
  • 1 pound (about 3 ½ cups) flour, unbleached
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons wheat bran, or wheat flour
  • 1 cup cold water

In a cup or small bowl, sprinkle the sugar into the warm water. Sprinkle the yeast over the surface of the water, set aside. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt and bran. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Once the yeast has begun to foam, add it and the cold water to the well. Begin stirring to moisten the dry ingredients. Once the water has been absorbed and most of the flour is part of the dough, cover the bowl and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Uncover bowl and use your hands to mix, using a gentle kneading motion to uniformly mix the dough.  Cover and allow to rest another 5-10 minutes. Turn the dough onto your work surface.  Knead for 2 to 3 minutes, just to insure that the dough is well mixed and the moisture is evenly distributed. Gather the dough into a firm ball.

Place the dough in a clean container or bowl that is at least twice its size. Try to cover it so that it is airtight; use plastic wrap if the container does not have a lid.

Allow to rise in a warm spot, 75° is ideal. After the dough has risen to double (1-2 hours), remove the cover and deflate the dough.  Do this by gently pushing your fists into the dough, then working it briefly to form a tight ball.  Return to container, cover, and let rise again. When dough has risen to twice its size, remove it to your work surface.  Deflate the dough with your hands, flattening it as you do this. Cut the dough into equal halves, and work each half gently.  You want to work out any remaining air, while tightening and shaping the dough. Let the two pieces of dough rest, covered, for 10 minutes. Remove one piece of dough, and place on the work surface in front of you.  Shape the baguettes, pinching the seams firmly. Place the shaped baguettes on a baking sheet sprinkled lightly with cornmeal.  If you have a stone in your oven, you can proof the baguettes on a kitchen towel sprinkled with cornmeal.  Cover with a towel and let rise. Preheat oven to 450°.

The loaves are ready to bake when they are springy to the touch, and the impression of your finger remains on the surface of the dough.  This should take 30—45 minutes, perhaps more if your kitchen is cold. Slash the loaves with a blade or serrated knife at a slight angle. The slashes should be several inches long, and should not cross each other. Using your fingertips, sprinkle the dough and pan lightly with water. Place the pan in the top 1/3 of the oven. Check the bread after 20 minutes, rotating pan 180°. Check the bread again after 10 more minutes.  At this point, check frequently. The loaves are done when they are a rich golden brown, and sound hollow when tapped. Remove to a rack to cool, or eat immediately. To rewarm a baguette: heat oven to 400°. Using your fingertips, sprinkle the loaf lightly with water. Bake on a pan, or directly on the oven rack or stone. Bread should be crispy and warm in 8-10 minutes.

Yocona Herbed Butter

  • 1 pound butter, unsalted, at room temperature
  • 1—1 ½ teaspoons salt (omit if using salted butter)
  • ¼ cup chives, dried
  • 1—2 teaspoons black pepper
  • ½ cup heavy cream

In the bowl of a mixer, combine the softened butter, salt, chives and black pepper. Using the paddle attachment, mix the butter on low speed for several minutes. Once the butter is very creamy, stop the mixer and put on the whisk attachment. Whisk the butter on low speed for a minute, then gradually increase the speed.  Allow the butter to whip for a couple of minutes. Slow down the mixer, and gradually pour in the heavy cream. Once the cream is incorporated, increase the speed of the mixer and whisk for several more minutes.

Transfer to a container and refrigerate.

Notes:

  • If you don’t have a standing mixer, a hand mixer will work. Just mix long enough to lighten the texture.
  • The butter can be stored in the refrigerator for a week or more—basically, through the date on your heavy cream carton.
  • You can use fresh chives, but after the butter sits overnight, the chives will “water out”.
  • The butter can be frozen.

Yocona in Exile on Urbanspoon

Burger Nights at Yocona

12 May

Photo by April Boyd

Love burgers? Love Yocona Sauce? Wednesday and Thursday nights, Yocona in Exile in Abbeville is now combining your two loves in the Yocona Burger, a half-pound Hereford filet burger topped with bacon, blue cheese, caramelized onions and Yocona Sauce.

Sign me up!

UPDATE 9/20: Thank you Paige for providing a photo of the Yocona burger.

How Green Are You?

21 Apr

By now I’m sure you’ve noticed that it’s been Green Week since Monday here in Oxford. Time to take stock of your impact on the environment. This means more than recycling a couple of cans and magazines; it also comes down to what you’re eating and where you’re obtaining your food. How often do you shop the Farmer’s Market? How much meat do you eat in any given week?

The Farmer’s Market, which is in full swing again, is a great place to start your shopping. Stocking up on fruits and vegetables that are in season and fresh from the grower is one of the best ways to buy local and support your community while being earth-friendly. There are also a multitude of farms in the area where you can find additional produce, dairy and meat before resorting to the large grocery stores that have products shipped in from across the country. Check out the site FarmtoMenu.com to find out about local farms and the Oxford restaurants that support them.

Melanie Addington had a very informative article in the Oxford Eagle on Monday about eating green. Something as simple as cutting down on the amount of animal products we eat can reduce methane gas emissions, hundreds of gallons of water and many other harmful gases that are produced with animal-based agriculture. Meg Shannon, who organizes monthly vegetarian potlucks, says that giving up even one pound of beef saves as much water as if you stopped showering for six months!

Some Oxford restaurants have started offering meat-free options, but many still haven’t jumped on the bandwagon. If you’re attempting to have a meat-free night out (perhaps to support Green Week), you’re often left with the choice of french fries and salad (hold the bacon). I believe that savvy restaurateurs who include enticing meat-free options when putting together their menus reap the rewards from that decision. There are more vegetarians and “part-time vegetarians” in Oxford than many realize.

If you’re looking to celebrate Green Week by avoiding meat for a meal or two, some restaurants that are already offering meat-free options include:

  • Yocona in Exile (the rotating menu always includes a vegetarian option)
  • Honey Bee Bakery (daily menu always features an herbivore soup and entree option)
  • Taqueria el Milagro (menu has a vegetarian section)
  • Boure (mushroom melt – lunch)
  • Tallulah’s Kitchen (black bean burger)
  • Ravine (vegetarian pasta of the day)
  • Waltz on the Square (baked ziti)
  • The Bungalow (portabella sandwich)
  • Red House (ultimate grilled cheese)
  • Frank & Marlee’s (veggie burger)
  • Newk’s (tomato basil soup and pizzas)
  • Oby’s (veggie po-boy and wrap)
  • Bangkok Thai (several options)
  • Two Stick (several options)
  • Kabuki (several options)
  • Maharaja Indian Cuisine (many options)
  • Turkuaz Cafe (falafel)
  • The Deli News (The Appeal)
  • Blind Pig (vegetarian po-boy)
  • Parrish’s (black bean wrap)
  • Taylor’s Pub (black bean chipotle veggie burger)
  • Mink’s On the Park (The Southern Star)

For more information on Green Week, check out the dedicated website here.

Vino-Free Valentine’s Day

7 Feb

OK, so by now you’ve heard that the Mississippi State Tax Commission is requesting–well, insisting–that we toast to our sweeties on Valentine’s Day with soda and sweet tea.

The Commission has denied the request to serve liquor next Sunday. However, if you’re set on celebrating over a glass of merlot, consider dining at one of the popular BYOB establishments such as Yocona in Exile, Taylor Grocery or Castle Hill Resort & Restaurant (as a resort, they can serve alcohol on Sundays). If you know of any BYOB establishments I’ve left out, please let me know by commenting here or contacting me at foodie@eatingoxford.com so we can all spread the word.

Have a great Valentine’s Day, and remember that you don’t need wine or a “sweetie” to feel the love from friends and family every day of the year.

A Yocona Kind of Sunday

17 Jan

Sundays are always my favorite day to go to Yocona because you can bring your own bottle of wine, it’s a nice short drive outside of town and, let’s face it, there’s not a whole lot going on in Oxford on a Sunday.

If you haven’t been to Abbeville to check out the opening of Yocona in Exile yet, you’ll arrive to find the former Yocona’s familiar bread and butter is waiting for you alongside oven-fried catfish and thick-cut filets with Yocona sauce.

Some of the highlights from this week’s menu include:

  • Catfish Creole – Mississippi farm-raised catfish, oven-fried in seasoned cornmeal, served with crawfish etouffee and wild rice.
  • Duck & Sausage Gumbo – A rich okra gumbo with roasted duck and Andouille sausage, served with wild rice.
  • Blue Cheese Strip – A 16 oz. Certified Hereford NY Strip, grilled to order and topped with blue cheese compound butter.
  • Sour Cream Cheesecake with Dark Chocolate Sauce

See this week’s full menu here.

Yocona in Exile on Urbanspoon

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